Redemptive Interventions

Have you said or thought…

“Your personal problems are becoming the company’s problems.”

“I really do care about your situation, but I’m a businessperson, not a pastor!”

 

Have you heard…

Research has shown a direct correlation between psychological wellbeing and performance. A study on a sample of 750 employees in the north west showed that an increase of one point on a psychological wellbeing scale of 1 to 5 points is associated with an increase in productivity of 8%.” (“Wellbeing, productivity and happiness at work”, Robertson I and Cooper C, 2011)

 

Increase staff productivity by increasing staff wellbeing

Companies need more than a good business model to succeed. They need an effective work-force – a positive, motivated, productive team. When your people are doing well, they perform at their best.

But you know that. The big question is: how can we best invest in the wellbeing of our staff?

 

On your team but not on your staff

The Redemptive Interventions approach is to engage consistently with your staff, getting to know your business and your people, and running staff-development activities on a weekly basis. But by operating on a consulting/contract basis, you only “pay for what you get”. So you effectively gain a team member without the burden of an additional staff member.

 

The business case

While staff wellbeing has strong human appeal, many business leaders question the financial appeal – will this investment add value to the business? Research into the correlation between employee wellbeing and company performance has yielded clear numeric evidence that improved staff wellbeing does result in improved business performance. Here are some conclusions:

There is a clear business case for investing in the health and wellbeing of staff, with progress in this area promising to benefit businesses, employees and the economy. This is about recognising the significance of managing health in the modern workplace, not just safety… Those businesses already demonstrating good practice have shown that moving ‘upstream’ – putting proactive and preventative measures in place – gives firms a competitive edge.”

– Confederation of British Industry (CBI) report, May 2014

“A three-year study across 41 global companies showed that operating margins improved by 4% in organisations with high employee engagement and declined by 2% in those with low employee engagement.”

– Global workforce survey, Towers Watson, 2010

Here are links to some comprehensive articles on the subject:

Gallup

Confederation of British Industry

Harvard Business Review

 

A tailored solution

Redemptive Interventions are tailored to suit the needs of your company. Initial interventions are exploratory, getting to know the business, the people and the prevailing opportunities and challenges. After that, interventions will focus on the identified needs. This is to avoid two common errors: “the shotgun approach” of trying everything in the hope that something will “hit the target”, and “the silver bullet approach” of assuming that the latest or most popular approach will transform your company.

 

Possible interventions

Here are some possible interventions:

  • Leadership and staff interviews (“taking the temperature”)
  • Surveys (anonymous data-collection)
  • Management team brainstorms (identifying possible solutions)
  • Motivational/inspirational/devotional/”life-skills” talks
  • Relationship skills development
  • Staff counselling
  • Conflict resolution
  • Time Management training
  • Problem-solving and decision-making training
  • Management and leadership training
  • Creative skills development
  • Business process evaluation/re-engineering (“clearing the clutter”)
  • Value Management training (“focussing on what counts”)

Interventions will not follow a “one size fits all” approach, but will be adapted to your needs. Meeting formats can vary from an informal circle or “round table” to a “lecture”. If there are significant needs in a particular area, we will invest significant time into that area. Work done each week can vary according to the needs identified and can be a combination of group sessions, individual sessions and review/planning meetings. Counselling can include the families of staff members (e.g. in the case of bereavement and other family crises).

 

About your intervenor…

Born in Durban, I was educated at Northlands Boys’ High School and UKZN (B.Sc. Engineering). I then completed my compulsory national service and was commissioned as a signal officer.

I pursued an engineering career for 18 years, focussing on product design and development, project management and people/team management. I was registered as a Professional Engineer (Pr Eng) in 1991. Post-graduate skills training included situational leadership, general management, project management, value management, business process re-engineering, team-building and creative skills development.

I then left industry and served a local church full-time as a pastor/elder for 10 years. This was a tremendous time of human-skills development as work included counselling, pastoral care, teaching and training (including developing course material) and conducting weddings and funerals. I have written and published three books.

I am passionate about people and love to see the broken restored and the struggling thrive. I believe that my combined experience of industry and church work have equipped me to make a significant positive impact on your workplace!

 

Download brochure:

Web_Redemptive_Interventions

Download leaflet:

Redemptive Interventions Intro

Email me:

alankwagner@gmail.com

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